Word pairs: confusing words

Questions
Overview

There are many words in English that look quite similar and even have a similar meanings but ultimately do have a different meaning. Getting comfortable with these words can take longer, so it helps to practise some of the most confusing ones. For example:

  • The situation has had a negative effect on my health.

  • The situation will negatively affect the employees.

  • Thanks for the compliment. You're too kind.

  • This wine complements the fish very well.

Further learning
Description Author Language
A quick explanation of when to use the verbs 'rob' and 'steal'. BBC Learning
A rapid explanation of when to use the verbs 'raise' and 'rise'. BBC Learning
When to use 'meeting' and 'appointment'. BBC Learning
When to use 'for' and 'since'. BBC Learning
Person vs. people BBC Learning
The difference between 'especially' and 'specially'. BBC Learning
The difference between 'miss' and 'lose'. Hello English Cork
The difference between 'affect' and 'effect'. BBC Learning
When to use 'remember' and 'remind'. BBC Learning